October 23, 2017

The Doomsday Fun Book

Published in February 2006, the Doomsday Fun Book is a folio-sized collection of editorials and other short articles, richly illustrated by Richard Willson, who was cartoonist extraordinary to The Ecologist from its beginning in 1970, and edited by Edward Goldsmith.

Find booksellers for the Funbook.

Read the back cover blurb here.


As Edward Goldsmith states in his introduction,

“The editorials are serious stuff – usually very worrying, often very depressing and sometimes infuriating. However there is a humorous side to the sheer ineptitude of our political and industrial leaders and of their pathological inability to tell the truth on the horrific implications of the policies they impose on us. Richard Willson, we think, has mastered the art of expressing this in his satirical drawings.

Though The Doomsday Fun Book covers but a small number of the social and environmental issues The Ecologist has dealt with in the last thirty-five years, it makes one thing clear: ‘economic development’, contrary to what we have been told, is the cause of, rather than the solution to, the ever more daunting problems we face today. This suggest we can only hope to solve them by moving our society in the very opposite direction to that in which we are moving today: towards a community-based, very much more self-sufficient and hence highly decentralised society.”

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From the back cover

The Doomsday Funbook is a collection of short articles from The Ecologist, illustrated by Richard Willson, of The Times, who has been cartoonist extraordinaire to the The Ecologist since it started in 1970.

Though The Doomsday Funbook covers but a small number of the social and environmental issues The Ecologist has dealt with in the last thirty-five years, it makes one thing clear: “economic development”, contrary to what we have all been taught, is the cause of, rather than the solution to, the ever more daunting problems we face today.

This suggests that we can only hope to solve them by moving our society in the very opposite direction to that in which we are moving today: towards a community-based, very much more self-sufficient and hence highly decentralised society.


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